mechanic

[muh-kan-ik]
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noun
  1. a person who repairs and maintains machinery, motors, etc.: an automobile mechanic.
  2. a worker who is skilled in the use of tools, machines, equipment, etc.
  3. Slang. a person skilled in the dishonest handling of cards, dice, or other objects used in games of chance.

Origin of mechanic

1350–1400; Middle English: mechanical < Latin mēchanicus < Greek mēchanikós, equivalent to mēchan(ḗ) machine + -ikos -ic
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


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British Dictionary definitions for mechanic

mechanic

noun
  1. a person skilled in maintaining or operating machinery, motors, etc
  2. archaic a common labourer

Word Origin for mechanic

C14: from Latin mēchanicus, from Greek mēkhanikos, from mēkhanē machine
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for mechanic
adj.

late 14c., "pertaining to or involving mechanical labor" (now usually mechanical), also "having to do with tools," from Latin mechanicus, from Greek mekhanikos "full of resources, inventive, ingenious," literally "mechanical, pertaining to machines," from mekhane (see machine (n.)). Meaning "of the nature of or pertaining to machines" is from 1620s.

n.

"manual laborer," late 14c., from Latin mechanicus, from Greek mekhanikos "an engineer," noun use of adjective meaning "full of resources, inventive, ingenious" (see mechanic (adj.)). Sense of "one who is employed in manual labor, a handicraft worker, an artisan" (chief sense through early 19c.) is attested from 1560s. Sense of "skilled workman who is concerned with making or repair of machinery" is from 1660s, but not the main sense until the rise of the automobile.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper