message

[mes-ij]
See more synonyms for message on Thesaurus.com
noun
  1. a communication containing some information, news, advice, request, or the like, sent by messenger, telephone, email, or other means.
  2. an official communication, as from a chief executive to a legislative body: the president's message to Congress.
  3. Digital Technology. a post or reply on an online message board.
  4. the inspired utterance of a prophet or sage.
  5. the point, moral, or meaning of a gesture, utterance, novel, motion picture, etc.
  6. Computers. a warning, permission, etc., communicated by the system or software to the user: an error message; a message to allow blocked content.
verb (used without object)
  1. to send a message, especially an electronic message.
verb (used with object)
  1. to send (a person) a message.
  2. to send as a message.
Idioms
  1. get the message, Informal. to understand or comprehend, especially to infer the correct meaning from circumstances, hints, etc.: If we don't invite him to the party, maybe he'll get the message.

Origin of message

1250–1300; Middle English < Old French < Vulgar Latin *missāticum, equivalent to Latin miss(us) sent (past participle of mittere to send) + -āticum -age
Related formsin·ter·mes·sage, noun, adjective
Can be confusedmassage message
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for message

Contemporary Examples of message

Historical Examples of message

  • Geta dared trust no one but me to carry a message to Clinias.

    Philothea

    Lydia Maria Child

  • To the porter who answered his ring he handed the message to be put off at the first stop.

    The Spenders

    Harry Leon Wilson

  • He returned at length with the message, "The lady says will you please step up-stairs."

    The Spenders

    Harry Leon Wilson

  • A bat circled near, indecisively, as if with a message it hesitated to give.

    The Spenders

    Harry Leon Wilson

  • Will you deliver your message, name your place and hour, and I shall meet you.


British Dictionary definitions for message

message

noun
  1. a communication, usually brief, from one person or group to another
  2. an implicit meaning or moral, as in a work of art
  3. a formal communiqué
  4. an inspired communication of a prophet or religious leader
  5. a mission; errand
  6. (plural) Scot shoppinggoing for the messages
  7. get the message informal to understand what is meant
verb
  1. (tr) to send as a message, esp to signal (a plan, etc)

Word Origin for message

C13: from Old French, from Vulgar Latin missāticum (unattested) something sent, from Latin missus, past participle of mittere to send
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for message
n.

c.1300, "communication transmitted via a messenger," from Old French message "message, news, tidings, embassy" (11c.), from Medieval Latin missaticum, from Latin missus "a sending away, sending, despatching; a throwing, hurling," noun use of past participle of mittere "to send" (see mission). The Latin word is glossed in Old English by ærende. Specific religious sense of "divinely inspired communication via a prophet" (1540s) led to transferred sense of "the broad meaning (of something)," first attested 1828. To get the message "understand" is from 1960.

v.

"to send messages," 1580s, from message (n.). Related: Messaged; messaging.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with message

message

see get the message.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.