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metonymy

[ mi-ton-uh-mee ]
/ mɪˈtɒn ə mi /
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noun Rhetoric.
a figure of speech that consists of the use of the name of one object or concept for that of another to which it is related, or of which it is a part, as “scepter” for “sovereignty,” or “the bottle” for “strong drink,” or “count heads (or noses)” for “count people.”

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Origin of metonymy

First recorded in 1540–50; from Latin metōnymia, from Greek metōnymía “change of name”; see origin at met-, -onym, -y3
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use metonymy in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for metonymy

metonymy
/ (mɪˈtɒnɪmɪ) /

noun plural -mies
the substitution of a word referring to an attribute for the thing that is meant, as for example the use of the crown to refer to a monarchCompare synecdoche

Derived forms of metonymy

metonymical (ˌmɛtəˈnɪmɪkəl) or metonymic, adjectivemetonymically, adverb

Word Origin for metonymy

C16: from Late Latin from Greek: a changing of name, from meta- (indicating change) + onoma name
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for metonymy

metonymy
[ mə-tŏnə-mē ]

n.
In schizophrenia, a language disturbance in which an inappropriate but related word is used in place of the correct one.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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