mittimus

[mit-uh-muh s]
noun, plural mit·ti·mus·es. Law.
  1. a warrant of commitment to prison.
  2. a writ for removing a suit or a record from one court to another.

Origin of mittimus

1400–50; late Middle English < Latin: we send, first word of such a writ; see remit
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for mittimus

Historical Examples of mittimus

  • He would not show us that, but caused a mittimus to be made, which mentioned that we "were to have had a meeting."

    George Fox

    George Fox

  • With this mittimus he delivered us to the constables to convey us to Leicester jail.

    George Fox

    George Fox

  • I still called to have the mittimus read; for that signified the cause of my commitment.

    George Fox

    George Fox

  • “Then,” said he, “I must commit you;” and ordered his clerk to make a mittimus.

  • He never once took his eyes off Palmer as he read the mittimus.


British Dictionary definitions for mittimus

mittimus

noun plural -muses
  1. law a warrant of commitment to prison or a command to a jailer directing him to hold someone in prison

Word Origin for mittimus

C15: from Latin: we send, the first word of such a command
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012