monody

[ mon-uh-dee ]
/ ˈmɒn ə di /

noun, plural mon·o·dies.

a Greek ode sung by a single voice, as in a tragedy; lament.
a poem in which the poet or speaker laments another's death; threnody.
Music.
  1. a style of composition in which one part or melody predominates; homophony, as distinguished from polyphony.
  2. a piece in this style.
  3. monophony (def. 1).

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seclusion

Origin of monody

First recorded in 1580–90; from Late Latin monōdia, from Greek monōidía “a solo, monody,” equivalent to monōid(ós) “singing alone” + -ia noun suffix; see mon-, ode) -y3

OTHER WORDS FROM monody

mon·o·dist [mon-uh-dist], /ˈmɒn ə dɪst/, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for monody

British Dictionary definitions for monody

monody
/ (ˈmɒnədɪ) /

noun plural -dies

(in Greek tragedy) an ode sung by a single actor
any poem of lament for someone's death
music a style of composition consisting of a single vocal part, usually with accompaniment

Derived forms of monody

monodic (mɒˈnɒdɪk) or monodical, adjectivemonodically, adverbmonodist, noun

Word Origin for monody

C17: via Late Latin from Greek monōidia, from mono- + aeidein to sing
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012