Moorish

[moo r-ish]

Origin of Moorish

First recorded in 1400–50, Moorish is from the late Middle English word morys. See Moor, -ish1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for moorish

Contemporary Examples of moorish

Historical Examples of moorish

  • In the streets of the Moorish city many a group still lingered.

    Leila, Complete

    Edward Bulwer-Lytton

  • Let them boast of their Moorish gallantry and their infidel marriages—a fig for them!

    Gomez Arias

    Joaqun Telesforo de Trueba y Coso

  • The Biarkemal would soon have drowned the Moorish ‘Lelhies.’

  • She had put it over her head for a hood, pretending to be a Moorish woman.

    The Scapegoat

    Hall Caine

  • The Moorish guards who kept it fell back at sight of him with looks of consternation.

    The Scapegoat

    Hall Caine


British Dictionary definitions for moorish

Moorish

adjective
  1. of or relating to the Moors
  2. denoting the style of architecture used in Spain from the 13th to 16th century, characterized by the horseshoe arch
Also: Morisco, Moresco
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for moorish

Moorish

adj.

"of or pertaining to Moors," mid-15c., from Moor + -ish.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper