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morel

1
[muh-rel]
noun
  1. any edible mushroom of the genus Morchella, especially M. esculenta.
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Origin of morel

1
1665–75; < French, Middle French morille, perhaps < Vulgar Latin *maurīcula, derivative of Medieval Latin maurus brown, dark-colored; see morel2, -cule1

morel

2

or mo·relle

[muh-rel]
noun
  1. any of several nightshades, especially the black nightshade.
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Origin of morel

2
1350–1400; Middle English morel(l)e < Anglo-French < Medieval Latin maurella, equivalent to maur(us) brown, dark-colored (adj. use of Latin Maurus Moor) + -ella -elle

Morel

[maw-rel; French maw-rel]
noun
  1. Jean [zhahn] /ʒɑ̃/, 1903–75, French orchestra conductor.
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Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for morel

Contemporary Examples of morel

Historical Examples of morel

  • Morel (the captain), the interpreter and myself went on shore.

  • Leaving him with his friends, Morel and I went for a walk through the village.

  • Meanwhile Morel was sitting in the best place by the fire, surrounded by the soldiers.

    War and Peace

    Leo Tolstoy

  • They gave him some more porridge and Morel with a laugh set to work on his third bowl.

    War and Peace

    Leo Tolstoy

  • Morel will do for me, I think, and you can have my brother Peter, no doubt.

    The Buffalo Runners

    R.M. Ballantyne


British Dictionary definitions for morel

morel

noun
  1. any edible saprotrophic ascomycetous fungus of the genus Morchella, in which the mushroom has a pitted cap: order Pezizales
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Word Origin for morel

C17: from French morille, probably of Germanic origin; compare Old High German morhila, diminutive of morha carrot
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for morel

n.

type of edible mushroom, 1670s, from French morille (16c.), of uncertain origin, apparently from Germanic; cf. Old High German morhilo (German Morchel), diminutive of morha "root of a tree or plant," from Proto-Germanic *murhon- (cf. Old English more, German möhre "carrot").

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper