Morse code

noun
  1. either of two systems of clicks and pauses, short and long sounds, or flashes of light, used to represent the letters of the alphabet, numerals, etc.: now used primarily in radiotelegraphy by ham operators.

Origin of Morse code

First recorded in 1830–40; after S. F. B. Morse
Also called Morse alphabet.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Related Words for morse code

cryptanalysis, cryptography

Examples from the Web for morse code

Historical Examples of morse code

  • Then he began, carefully, methodically to send a Morse-code message to his companion via his winking eyes.

    Danger in Deep Space

    Carey Rockwell


British Dictionary definitions for morse code

Morse code

noun
  1. a telegraph code formerly used internationally for transmitting messages; it was superseded by satellite technology (the Global Marine Distress and Safety System) in 1999. Letters, numbers, etc, are represented by groups of shorter dots and longer dashes, or by groups of the corresponding sounds, dits and dahs, the groups being separated by spacesAlso called: international Morse code

Word Origin for Morse code

C19: named after Samuel Morse
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for morse code

Morse code

n.

1867, earlier Morse key (1858), in honor of Samuel F.B. Morse (1791-1872), U.S. inventor who produced a system of telegraphic communication 1836. He invented both the recording telegraph and the alphabet of dots and dashes.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

morse code in Science

Morse code

  1. A code developed by Samuel Morse used for transmitting messages in which letters of the alphabet and numbers are represented by various sequences of written dots and dashes, or short and long signals such as electric tones or voltages. Morse code was used extensively in telegraphy. In a format that has been standardized for international use, it is still sometimes used for long distance radio communication.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.