mound

1
[ mound ]
/ maʊnd /

noun

verb (used with object)

to form into a mound; heap up.
to furnish with a mound of earth, as for a defense.

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Origin of mound

1
1505–15; earlier: hedge or fence used as a boundary or protection, (v.) to enclose with a fence; compare Old English mund hand, hence protection, protector; cognate with Old Norse mund,Middle Dutch mond protection

OTHER WORDS FROM mound

un·mound·ed, adjective

Definition for mound (2 of 2)

mound2
[ mound ]
/ maʊnd /

noun

a globe topped with a cross that symbolizes power and constitutes part of the regalia of an English sovereign.

Origin of mound

2
1250–1300; Middle English: world <Old French monde<Latin mundus world
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for mound

British Dictionary definitions for mound (1 of 2)

mound1
/ (maʊnd) /

noun

verb

(often foll by up) to gather into a mound; heap
(tr) to cover or surround with a moundto mound a grave

Other words from mound

Related adjective: tumular

Word Origin for mound

C16: earthwork, perhaps from Old English mund hand, hence defence: compare Middle Dutch mond protection

British Dictionary definitions for mound (2 of 2)

mound2
/ (maʊnd) /

noun

heraldry a rare word for orb (def. 1)

Word Origin for mound

C13 (meaning: world, C16: orb): from French monde, from Latin mundus world
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012