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multure

[ muhl-cher ]
/ ˈmʌl tʃər /
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noun Scots Law.

a toll or fee given to the proprietor of a mill for the grinding of grain, usually consisting of a fixed proportion of the grain brought or of the flour made.

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Origin of multure

1250–1300; Middle English multir<Old French molture<Medieval Latin molitūra a grinding, equivalent to Latin molit(us) (past participle of molere) to grind + -ūra-ure
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

British Dictionary definitions for multure

multure
/ (ˈmʌltʃə) /

noun Scot

a fee formerly paid to a miller for grinding grain
the right to receive such a fee

Word Origin for multure

C13: from Old French moulture, from Medieval Latin molitūra a grinding, from Latin molere
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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