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nominative

[ nom-uh-nuh-tiv, nom-nuh- nom-uh-ney-tiv ]

adjective

  1. Grammar.
    1. (in certain inflected languages, as Sanskrit, Latin, and Russian) noting a case having as its function the indication of the subject of a finite verb, as in Latin Nauta bonus est “The sailor is good,” with nauta “sailor” in the nominative case.
    2. similar to such a case in function or meaning. Compare subjective.
  2. nominated; appointed by nomination.
  3. made out in a person's name, as a certificate or security.


noun

, Grammar.
  1. the nominative case.
  2. a word in the nominative case.
  3. a form or construction of similar function or meaning.

nominative

/ ˈnɒmɪnətɪv; ˌnɒmɪnəˈtaɪvəl; ˌnɒmnə-; ˈnɒmnə- /

adjective

  1. grammar denoting a case of nouns and pronouns in inflected languages that is used esp to identify the subject of a finite verb See also subjective
  2. appointed rather than elected to a position, office, etc
  3. bearing the name of a person


noun

  1. grammar
    1. the nominative case
    2. a word or speech element in the nominative case

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Derived Forms

  • nominatival, adjective
  • ˈnominatively, adverb

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Other Words From

  • nomi·na·tive·ly adverb
  • un·nomi·native adjective

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Word History and Origins

Origin of nominative1

1350–1400; < Latin nominātīvus ( nominate, -ive ), replacing Middle English nominatif < Middle French < Latin as above

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Word History and Origins

Origin of nominative1

C14: from Latin nōminātīvus belonging to naming, from nōmen name

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Example Sentences

Her spot, however was a newly created nominative one, that allowed her to compete in the all-around competition but not in the team event.

From Time

As it stands, Carey in the nominative spot is a de facto alternate for the four-person team.

Drench is the causative of drink: here the nominative of the verb is ‘Iris’ and the object ‘beds.’

A personal pronoun has two cases the nominative and the objective.

Moreover, fet of the plural applies only to the nominative and accusative; the genitive has fota, the dative fotum.

The number of the nominative pronoun appears to be thus rendered precise, but the objective is still indefinite.

By adding this form to the active verb, its action is reversed, and thrown back on the nominative.

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nominationnominative absolute