nominative case

[ (nom-uh-nuh-tiv) ]


The grammatical term indicating that a noun or pronoun is the subject of a sentence or clause rather than its object. (See case and objective case.)

Words Nearby nominative case

The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

How to use nominative case in a sentence

  • Substantives which end in a vowel in Anglo-Saxon, in the nominative case, take a final -e in Chaucer, in the nom.

  • The Frenchman uses moi in the nominative case when je would be inharmonious.

    The Verbalist | Thomas Embly Osmun, (AKA Alfred Ayres)
  • The verb “applauded” has here no nominative case, whereas it ought to have been governed by the pronoun “he.”

  • This form of the personal pronoun is properly used in the nominative case only where increased emphasis is aimed at.

    The Verbalist | Thomas Embly Osmun, (AKA Alfred Ayres)
  • Some intransitive verbs require a predicate noun or pronoun in the nominative case, or an adjective, to complete their meaning.

    Business English | Rose Buhlig