debilitate

[dih-bil-i-teyt]
verb (used with object), de·bil·i·tat·ed, de·bil·i·tat·ing.
  1. to make weak or feeble; enfeeble: The siege of pneumonia debilitated her completely.

Origin of debilitate

1525–35; < Latin dēbilitātus (past participle of dēbilitāre), equivalent to dēbilit-, stem of dēbilis weak + -ātus -ate1
Related formsde·bil·i·tant, nounde·bil·i·ta·tion, nounde·bil·i·ta·tive, adjectivenon·de·bil·i·tat·ing, adjectivenon·de·bil·i·ta·tion, nounnon·de·bil·i·ta·tive, adjectiveo·ver·de·bil·i·tate, verb (used with object), o·ver·de·bil·i·tat·ed, o·ver·de·bil·i·tat·ing.un·de·bil·i·tat·ed, adjectiveun·de·bil·i·tat·ing, adjectiveun·de·bil·i·ta·tive, adjective

Synonyms for debilitate

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

British Dictionary definitions for non-debilitating

debilitate

verb
  1. (tr) to make feeble; weaken
Derived Formsdebilitation, noun

Word Origin for debilitate

C16: from Latin dēbilitāre, from dēbilis weak
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for non-debilitating

debilitate

v.

1530s, from Latin debilitatus, past participle of debilitare "to weaken," from debilis "weak" (see debility). Related: Debilitated; debilitating.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper