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nones

1

[ nohnz ]

noun

, Ecclesiastical.
  1. the fifth of the seven canonical hours, or the service for it, originally fixed for the ninth hour of the day (or 3 p.m.).


nones

2

[ nohnz ]

noun

, (used with a singular or plural verb)
  1. (in the ancient Roman calendar) the ninth day before the ides, both days included: the seventh of March, May, July, and October, and the fifth of the other months.

nones

/ nəʊnz /

noun

  1. (in the Roman calendar) the ninth day before the ides of each month: the seventh day of March, May, July, and October, and the fifth of each other month See also calends
  2. RC Church the fifth of the seven canonical hours of the divine office, originally fixed at the ninth hour of the day, about 3 pm


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Word History and Origins

Origin of nones1

1375–1425; late Middle English; plural of none 2

Origin of nones2

1375–1425; late Middle English; Anglicization of Latin nōnae, originally feminine plural of nōnus ninth
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Word History and Origins

Origin of nones1

Old English nōn, from Latin nōna hora ninth hour, from nōnus ninth
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Example Sentences

Growth of the nones is a hot topic among American evangelicals.

In contrast, religious “nones” are a rising political force, and are at home within the Democratic Party.

Meanwhile, religious “nones” and “others” are now a fifth of those who go to the polls.

"She has actually had a nones—six candles have been burning for days before the image," said Venturita.

And not a dewdrop fell from grass till midday, and wind would not touch a beast's tail until nones.

Eubulus was also reserved to the nones of March, and was then cast to the beasts.

Nones (Latin nonae, from nonus, the ninth,) the ninth day before the Ides.

The library was to be open to the public every week day for two hours before Nones (or nine), and for two hours after Nones.

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