nourish

[nur-ish, nuhr-]
verb (used with object)
  1. to sustain with food or nutriment; supply with what is necessary for life, health, and growth.
  2. to cherish, foster, keep alive, etc.: He had long nourished the dream of living abroad.
  3. to strengthen, build up, or promote: to nourish discontent among the workers; to nourish the arts in one's community.

Origin of nourish

1250–1300; Middle English norisshe < Old French noriss-, long stem of norir < Latin nūtrīre to feed; see nurse, -ish2
Related formsnour·ish·a·ble, adjectivenour·ish·er, nouno·ver·nour·ish, verb (used with object)re·nour·ish, verb (used with object)self-nour·ished, adjectiveun·nour·ish·a·ble, adjectiveun·nour·ished, adjectivewell-nour·ished, adjective

Synonyms for nourish

1. See nurse. 3. encourage, help, aid, back, advance.

Antonyms for nourish

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for nourisher

Historical Examples of nourisher

  • She was the source of abundance and the nourisher of gods and men.

    Ancient Man in Britain

    Donald A. (Donald Alexander) Mackenzie

  • Finally her son, Ra Helios, appears as the last of the series in the character of father and nourisher of terrestrial things.

    The Ceramic Art

    Jennie J. Young

  • The sun was the symbol of Ra, the sun-god, the father and nourisher of terrestrial things.

    The Ceramic Art

    Jennie J. Young

  • The true home is the inspirer and nourisher of all that is best in life—in our American life; but men must learn the new lesson.

    Unleavened Bread

    Robert Grant

  • The palm branch is merely another form of the fern or fish-bone, and the word palm is radically alma, the all nourisher.

    Archaic England

    Harold Bayley


British Dictionary definitions for nourisher

nourish

verb (tr)
  1. to provide with the materials necessary for life and growth
  2. to support or encourage (an idea, feeling, etc); fosterto nourish resentment
Derived Formsnourisher, nounnourishing, adjectivenourishingly, adverb

Word Origin for nourish

C14: from Old French norir, from Latin nūtrīre to feed, care for
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for nourisher

nourish

v.

late 13c., "to bring up, nurture" (a child, a feeling, etc.), from Old French norriss-, stem of norrir "raise, bring up, nurture, foster; maintain, provide for" (12c., Modern French nourrir), from Latin nutrire "to feed, nurse, foster, support, preserve," from *nutri (older form of nutrix "nurse"), literally "she who gives suck," from PIE *nu- (from root *(s)nau- "to swim, flow, let flow," hence "to suckle;" see nutriment) + fem. agent suffix. Related: Nourished; nourishing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

nourisher in Medicine

nourish

[nûrĭsh]
v.
  1. To provide with food or other substances necessary for sustaining life and growth.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.