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Nova Scotia

[ noh-vuh -skoh-shuh ]
/ ˈnoʊ və ˈskoʊ ʃə /
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noun

a peninsula and province in SE Canada: once a part of the French province of Acadia. 21,068 sq. mi. (54,565 sq. km). Capital: Halifax.
Informal. Nova Scotia salmon.

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OTHER WORDS FROM Nova Scotia

Nova Scotian, adjective, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for Nova Scotia

British Dictionary definitions for Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia
/ (ˈnəʊvə ˈskəʊʃə) /

noun

a peninsula in E Canada, between the Gulf of St Lawrence and the Bay of Fundy
a province of E Canada, consisting of the Nova Scotia peninsula and Cape Breton Island: first settled by the French as Acadia. Capital: Halifax. Pop: 936 960 (2004 est). Area: 52 841 sq km (20 402 sq miles)
Abbreviation: NS
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Cultural definitions for Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia

Province in eastern Canada, including a peninsula to the east of New Brunswick and Cape Breton Island, as well as several smaller adjacent islands. With New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia makes up the Maritime Provinces. Halifax is its capital and largest city.

notes for Nova Scotia

French settlers, who called the area Acadia, were expelled by the British in the 1750s. Many of the exiled Acadians settled in Louisiana and became the ancestors of today's Cajuns.
The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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