novel

1
[nov-uh l]
noun
  1. a fictitious prose narrative of considerable length and complexity, portraying characters and usually presenting a sequential organization of action and scenes.
  2. (formerly) novella(def 1).

Origin of novel

1
1560–70; < Italian novella (storia) new kind of story. See novel2
Related formsnov·el·like, adjective

novel

3
[nov-uh l]
noun
  1. Roman Law.
    1. an imperial enactment subsequent and supplementary to an imperial compilation and codification of authoritative legal materials.
    2. Usually Novels,imperial enactments subsequent to the promulgation of Justinian's Code and supplementary to it: one of the four divisions of the Corpus Juris Civilis.
  2. Civil Law. an amendment to a statute.

Origin of novel

3
1605–15; < Late Latin novella (constitūtiō) a new (regulation, order). See novel2
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for novels

Contemporary Examples of novels

Historical Examples of novels

  • Must all novels end with an earthly marriage, and nothing be left for heaven?

    Malbone

    Thomas Wentworth Higginson

  • Novels are taken up to amuse the vacant hour—in this consists their use.

  • Hinde had read it and thought it was as good as most first novels.

    The Foolish Lovers

    St. John G. Ervine

  • The novel was for him that assiette; and all his novels are here.

    Joseph Andrews Vol. 1

    Henry Fielding

  • Yes, he thought so; but I believed the glow in his tone was for novels.

    The Cavalier

    George Washington Cable


British Dictionary definitions for novels

Novels

pl n
  1. Roman law the new statutes of Justinian and succeeding emperors supplementing the Institutes, Digest, and Code: now forming part of the Corpus Juris Civilis

Word Origin for Novels

Latin Novellae (constitūtiōnēs) new (laws)

novel

1
noun
  1. an extended work in prose, either fictitious or partly so, dealing with character, action, thought, etc, esp in the form of a story
  2. the novel the literary genre represented by novels
  3. (usually plural) obsolete a short story or novella, as one of those in the Decameron of Boccaccio

Word Origin for novel

C15: from Old French novelle, from Latin novella (narrātiō) new (story); see novel ²

novel

2
adjective
  1. of a kind not seen before; fresh; new; originala novel suggestion

Word Origin for novel

C15: from Latin novellus new, diminutive of novus new

novel

3
noun
  1. Roman law a new decree or an amendment to an existing statuteSee also Novels
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for novels

novel

adj.

"new, strange, unusual," early 15c., but little used before 1600, from Old French novel, nouvel "new, young, fresh, recent; additional; early, soon" (Modern French nouveau, fem. nouvelle), from Latin novellus "new, young, recent," diminutive of novus "new" (see new).

novel

n.

"fictitious narrative," 1560s, from Italian novella "short story," originally "new story," from Latin novella "new things" (cf. Middle French novelle, French nouvelle), neuter plural or fem. of novellus (see novel (adj.)). Originally "one of the tales or short stories in a collection" (especially Boccaccio's), later (1630s) "long work of fiction," works which had before that been called romances.

A novel is like a violin bow; the box which gives off the sounds is the soul of the reader. [Stendhal, "Life of Henri Brulard"]
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

novels in Culture

novel

A long, fictional narration in prose. Great Expectations and Huckleberry Finn are novels, as are War and Peace and Lord of the Flies.

The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.