nuclear magnetic resonance


noun Physics.

the selective absorption of electromagnetic radiation by an atomic nucleus in the presence of a strong, static, magnetic field: used in research and in medicine to monitor tissue metabolism and to distinguish between normal and abnormal cells. Abbreviation: NMR
Compare MRI.

Origin of nuclear magnetic resonance

First recorded in 1940–45
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for nuclear magnetic resonance

nuclear magnetic resonance


noun

a technique for determining the magnetic moments of nuclei by subjecting a substance to high-frequency radiation and a large magnetic field. The technique is used as a method of determining structureAbbreviation: NMR See also electron spin resonance
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medicine definitions for nuclear magnetic resonance

nuclear magnetic resonance


n.

The absorption of electromagnetic radiation of a specific frequency by an atomic nucleus that is placed in a strong magnetic field, used especially in spectroscopic studies of molecular structure and in medicine to measure rates of metabolism.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Science definitions for nuclear magnetic resonance

nuclear magnetic resonance


The absorption of electromagnetic energy (typically radio waves) by the nuclei of atoms placed in a strong magnetic field. The nuclei of different atoms absorb unique frequencies of radiation depending on their environment, thus by observing which frequencies are absorbed by a sample placed in a strong magnetic field (and later emitted again, when the magnetic field is removed), it is possible to learn much about the sample's makeup and structure. Nuclear magnetic resonance has no known side effects on the human body, and is therefore used to analyze soft body tissues in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).
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