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nuncupative

[ nuhng-kyuh-pey-tiv, nuhng-kyoo-puh-tiv ]

adjective

  1. (especially of a will) oral; not written.


nuncupative

/ ˈnʌŋkjʊˌpeɪtɪv; nʌŋˈkjuːpətɪv /

adjective

  1. (of a will) declared orally by the testator and later written down


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Word History and Origins

Origin of nuncupative1

First recorded in 1400–50; from Medieval Latin (testāmentum) nuncupātīvum “oral (will),” neuter of Late Latin nuncupātīvus “so-called, nominal,” equivalent to Latin nuncupāt(us), past participle of nuncupāre “to state formally, utter the name of” (probably from unattested nōmicupāre, derivative of nōmiceps “one taking a name,” equivalent to nōmi- combining form of nōmen “name” + -ceps “taker, catcher”); prince ( def ) ) + -īvus -ive ( def )

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Word History and Origins

Origin of nuncupative1

C16: from Late Latin nuncupātīvus nominal, from Latin nuncupāre to name

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Example Sentences

Upon this, Chancellor Kent observed: “I should hope to see one day a law that no nuncupative will should be valid in any case.”

In this country, the cases upon the subject of nuncupative wills are considerably numerous since the last civil war.

Now let any man judge what a precious Legacy it is that he bequeaths by his nuncupative will to his friends in Tacitus.

It is true that under certain exceptional circumstances a man may make what is known as a nuncupative will.

The will of the Minstrel of Paradise is a nuncupative one taken by his daughter, the great poet being blind.

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nunclenuncupative will