okra

[oh-kruh]
noun
  1. a shrub, Abelmoschus esculentus, of the mallow family, bearing beaked pods.
  2. the pods, used in soups, stews, etc.
  3. a dish made with the pods.

Origin of okra

First recorded in 1670–80; said to be of West African origin, though precise source unknown; compare Igbo ókùrù okra
Also called gumbo.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for okra

Contemporary Examples of okra

  • We played there endlessly, and Mama planted a garden of greens, okra and peppers.

    The Daily Beast logo
    My Vanished Liberia

    Leymah Gbowee

    October 7, 2011

  • A West African native, okra is one of the stranger vegetables to make its way into regional American cuisine.

    The Daily Beast logo
    The Perfect Okra

    Cookstr.com

    February 16, 2010

  • But okra is not just a vegetable of West Africa and North America.

    The Daily Beast logo
    The Perfect Okra

    Cookstr.com

    February 16, 2010

Historical Examples of okra


British Dictionary definitions for okra

okra

noun
  1. Also called: ladies' fingers an annual malvaceous plant, Hibiscus esculentus, of the Old World tropics, with yellow-and-red flowers and edible oblong sticky green pods
  2. the pod of this plant, eaten in soups, stews, etcSee also gumbo (def. 1)

Word Origin for okra

C18: of W African origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for okra
n.

1670s, from a West African language (cf. Akan nkruma "okra").

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper