oof

Derived Formsoofy, adjective

Word Origin for oof

C19: from Yiddish ooftisch, from German auf dem Tische on the table (referring to gambling stakes)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Examples from the Web for oof

Contemporary Examples of oof

Historical Examples of oof

  • And I cut off his head with one stroke, like a feather, while he only said 'Oof!'

  • Well, if I was a Johnny, and had got the oof, she'd have a brougham and a sealskin to-morrow.

    The Christian

    Hall Caine

  • They give the oof, the dollars, the shekels, and do not give the power to enjoy.

    The Island Mystery

    George A. Birmingham

  • And if not, still Corinne and I will have had eight weeks in Paris with oof which we can burn.

    The Island Mystery

    George A. Birmingham

  • Ouphe, pronounced "oof," is an old-fashioned word for goblin or elf.

    Wonder-Box Tales

    Jean Ingelow