organist

[awr-guh-nist]

Origin of organist

1585–95; < Medieval Latin organista; equivalent to organ(um) organ + -ista -ist
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for organist

Historical Examples of organist

  • Yes, she knew what he was—he was the organist at All Saints', Belgravia.

    The Christian

    Hall Caine

  • It was Koenig, the organist, and John Storm shuddered in the darkest corner of his soul.

    The Christian

    Hall Caine

  • No organist, no choir, no clerk, and next to no congregation.

    The Christian

    Hall Caine

  • “There is a thing I wanted to speak about last night,” the organist said.

    The Nebuly Coat

    John Meade Falkner

  • “He is a chip of the old block,” the organist said again bitterly.

    The Nebuly Coat

    John Meade Falkner


British Dictionary definitions for organist

organist

noun
  1. a person who plays the organ
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for organist
n.

1590s, from organ + -ist, or from or influenced by Middle French organiste, from Medieval Latin organista "one who plays an organ," from Latin organum (see organ).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper