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orphan

[ awr-fuhn ]
/ ˈɔr fən /
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noun
adjective
verb (used with object)
to deprive of parents or a parent through death: He was orphaned at the age of four.
Informal. to deprive of commercial sponsorship, an employer, etc.: The recession has orphaned many experienced workers.
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Origin of orphan

1425–75; late Middle English (noun) <Late Latin orphanus destitute, without parents <Greek orphanós bereaved; akin to Latin orbus bereaved

OTHER WORDS FROM orphan

or·phan·hood, nounhalf-orphan, nounun·or·phaned, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use orphan in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for orphan

orphan
/ (ˈɔːfən) /

noun
  1. a child, one or (more commonly) both of whose parents are dead
  2. (as modifier)an orphan child
printing the first line of a paragraph separated from the rest of the paragraph by occurring at the foot of a page
verb
(tr) to deprive of one or both parents

Word Origin for orphan

C15: from Late Latin orphanus, from Greek orphanos; compare Latin orbus bereaved
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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