Ossianic

[os-ee-an-ik, osh-ee-]
adjective
  1. of, relating to, or characteristic of Ossian, the poetry attributed to him, or the rhythmic prose published by James Macpherson in 1762–63, purporting to be a translation from the Scottish Gaelic.
  2. grandiloquent; bombastic.

Origin of Ossianic

First recorded in 1800–10; Ossian + -ic
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for ossianic

Historical Examples of ossianic

  • A servile imitation of an Ossianic lament, which appeared anonymously.

    Ossian in Germany

    Rudolf Tombo

  • A number of Ossianic songs with the following titles: Die Nacht.

    Ossian in Germany

    Rudolf Tombo

  • The melancholy of Novalis sought consolation in the Ossianic joy of grief.

    Ossian in Germany

    Rudolf Tombo

  • The entire Stimmung is Ossianic and Ossianic touches are not wanting, as when the poet says, ll.

    Ossian in Germany

    Rudolf Tombo

  • Another Ossianic reminder is contained in the second stanza of this poem.

    Ossian in Germany

    Rudolf Tombo


British Dictionary definitions for ossianic

Ossianic

adjective
  1. of, relating to, or reminiscent of Ossian, a legendary Irish hero and bard of the 3rd century a.d
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for ossianic

Ossianic

adj.

1808, in reference to Oisin, name of a legendary Gaelic bard, literally "little fawn;" James Macpherson claimed to have collected and translated his works (1760-1763) under the name Ossian, and the poetic prose sparked a Celtic revival and fascination with the glamor of the lost world of the bards. The work turned out to be Macpherson's forgery, and the style later was regarded as bombastic, but the resulting swerve in European literature was real.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper