imitation

[im-i-tey-shuh n]

noun

adjective

designed to imitate a genuine or superior article or thing: imitation leather.
Jewelry. noting an artificial gem no part of which is of the true gemstone.Compare assembled, synthetic(def 5).

Origin of imitation

1350–1400; Middle English < Latin imitātiōn- (stem of imitātiō). See imitate, -ion
Related formsim·i·ta·tion·al, adjectivenon·im·i·ta·tion·al, adjectiveo·ver·im·i·ta·tion, nounpre·im·i·ta·tion, nounself-im·i·ta·tion, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for overimitation

imitation

noun

the act, practice, or art of imitating; mimicry
an instance or product of imitating, such as a copy of the manner of a person; impression
  1. a copy or reproduction of a genuine article; counterfeit
  2. (as modifier)imitation jewellery
(in contrapuntal or polyphonic music) the repetition of a phrase or figure in one part after its appearance in another, as in a fugue
a literary composition that adapts the style of an older work to the writer's own purposes
Derived Formsimitational, adjective
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for overimitation

imitation

n.

c.1400, "emulation; act of copying," from Old French imitacion, from Latin imitationem (nominative imitatio) "a copying, imitation," from past participle stem of imitari "to copy, portray, imitate," from PIE *im-eto-, from root *aim- "copy" (cf. Hittite himma- "imitation, substitute"). Meaning "an artificial likeness" is from c.1600. As an adjective, from 1840.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper