Pallas

[pal-uh s]

Athena

[uh-thee-nuh]
noun
  1. Also A·the·ne [uh-thee-nee] /əˈθi ni/. Also called Pallas, Pallas Athena. the virgin deity of the ancient Greeks worshiped as the goddess of wisdom, fertility, the useful arts, and prudent warfare. At her birth she sprang forth fully armed from the head of her father, Zeus.Compare Minerva.
  2. a female given name.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

British Dictionary definitions for pallas athena

Pallas Athena

Pallas

noun
  1. another name for Athena

Pallas

noun
  1. astronomy the second largest asteroid (diameter 520 km), revolving around the sun in a period of 4.62 years

Athena

Athene (əˈθiːnɪ)

noun
  1. Greek myth a virgin goddess of wisdom, practical skills, and prudent warfare. She was born, fully armed, from the head of ZeusAlso called: Pallas Athena, Pallas Roman counterpart: Minerva
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for pallas athena

Athena

Greek goddess of wisdom, skill in the arts, warfare, etc., from Latin Athena, from Greek Athene, perhaps from a name in a lost pre-Hellenic language.

Pallas

Greek goddess' name, literally "little maiden," related to pallake "concubine," and probably somehow connected to Avestan pairika "beautiful women seducing pious men."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

pallas athena in Science

Pallas

[păləs]
  1. The second largest asteroid, measuring about 570 km (353 mi) at its greatest diameter, and the second to be discovered, in 1802. See more at asteroid.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pallas athena in Culture

Athena

[Roman name Minerva]

The Greek and Roman goddess of wisdom. She had an unusual birth, springing fully grown out of the forehead of her father, Zeus. Athena was one of the goddesses angered by the Judgment of Paris, a Trojan, and she therefore helped the Greeks in the ensuing Trojan War (see also Trojan War). Eventually, she became the protector of Odysseus on his journey home.

Note

Athena was the guardian of the city of Athens (see also Athens), which was named in her honor.
The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.