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pantofle

or pan·tof·fle

[ pan-tuh-fuhl, pan-tof-uhl, -toh-fuhl, -too- ]
/ ˈpæn tə fəl, pænˈtɒf əl, -ˈtoʊ fəl, -ˈtu- /
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See synonyms for: pantofle / pantofles on Thesaurus.com

noun
a slipper.
a cork-soled patten covering the forepart of the foot, worn in the 16th century.
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Origin of pantofle

First recorded in 1485–95; late Middle English pantaffle, pantouffle, from Middle French pantoufle; compare Old Italian pantofola, Provençal pantofla; further origin uncertain
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use pantofle in a sentence

  • An harlot is like a pantofle or slipper at an inne, which is ready to serve for every foote that comes.

    Diary of John Manningham|John Manningham

British Dictionary definitions for pantofle

pantofle

pantoffle pantoufle (pænˈtuːfəl)

/ (pænˈtɒfəl) /

noun
archaic a kind of slipper

Word Origin for pantofle

C15: from French pantoufle, from Old Italian pantofola, perhaps from Medieval Greek pantophellos shoe made of cork, from panto- + phellos cork
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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