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pantograph

[ pan-tuh-graf, -grahf ]
/ ˈpæn təˌgræf, -ˌgrɑf /
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noun
Also pan·ta·graph . an instrument for the mechanical copying of plans, diagrams, etc., on any desired scale.
Electricity. a device usually consisting of two parallel, hinged, double-diamond frames, for transferring current from an overhead wire to a vehicle, as a trolley car or electric locomotive.
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Origin of pantograph

First recorded in 1715–25; panto- + -graph

OTHER WORDS FROM pantograph

pan·tog·ra·pher [pan-tog-ruh-fer], /pænˈtɒg rə fər/, nounpan·to·graph·ic [pan-tuh-graf-ik], /ˌpæn təˈgræf ɪk/, pan·to·graph·i·cal, adjectivepan·to·graph·i·cal·ly, adverbpan·tog·ra·phy, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use pantograph in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for pantograph

pantograph
/ (ˈpæntəˌɡrɑːf) /

noun
an instrument consisting of pivoted levers for copying drawings, maps, etc, to any desired scale
a sliding type of current collector, esp a diamond-shaped frame mounted on a train roof in contact with an overhead wire
a device consisting of a parallelogram of jointed rods used to suspend a studio lamp so that its height can be adjusted

Derived forms of pantograph

pantographer (pænˈtɒɡrəfə), nounpantographic (ˌpæntəˈɡræfɪk), adjectivepantographically, adverbpantography, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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