pasquinade

[ pas-kwuh-neyd ]
/ ˌpæs kwəˈneɪd /

noun

a satire or lampoon, especially one posted in a public place.

verb (used with object), pas·quin·ad·ed, pas·quin·ad·ing.

to assail in a pasquinade or pasquinades.

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Origin of pasquinade

First recorded in 1650–60; from French, from Italian pasquinata “lampoon, satire,” derivative of Italian Pasquino, supposedly the name of a local Roman schoolmaster (or tailor, or shoemaker, or barber) and the nickname given to a 3rd-century b.c. Roman statue that was unearthed in 1501 and was annually decorated and posted with verses + -ata feminine noun suffix; see origin at -ade1

OTHER WORDS FROM pasquinade

pas·quin·ad·er, nounpas·quin·i·an [pas-kwin-ee-uhn], /pæsˈkwɪn i ən/, adjective

Words nearby pasquinade

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for pasquinade

British Dictionary definitions for pasquinade

pasquinade

pasquil (ˈpæskwɪl)

/ (ˌpæskwɪˈneɪd) /

noun

an abusive lampoon or satire, esp one posted in a public place

verb -ades, -ading, -aded, -quils, -quilling or -quilled

(tr) to ridicule with pasquinade

Derived forms of pasquinade

pasquinader, noun

Word Origin for pasquinade

C17: from Italian Pasquino name given to an ancient Roman statue disinterred in 1501, which was annually posted with satirical verses
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012