pelvic

[pel-vik]

Origin of pelvic

First recorded in 1820–30; pelv(is) + -ic
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for pelvic

Contemporary Examples of pelvic

Historical Examples of pelvic

  • The correspondence between the thoracic and pelvic limbs is notorious.

    On the Genesis of Species

    St. George Mivart

  • He carried the pelvic viscera in his pocket to the class-room.

    Medical Essays

    Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

  • "I don't think I'll bother with pelvic measurements," he said.

    This Crowded Earth

    Robert Bloch

  • Her pelvic curve was classic, her legs long and not knock-kneed.

    Painted Veils

    James Huneker

  • In Dipnoi however the pelvic fins are very similar to the pectoral.

    The Vertebrate Skeleton

    Sidney H. Reynolds


British Dictionary definitions for pelvic

pelvic

adjective
  1. of, near, or relating to the pelvis
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for pelvic
adj.

1830, irregularly formed from pelvis + -ic. OED prefers "the better-formed" French pelvien.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

pelvic in Medicine

pelvic

[pĕlvĭk]
adj.
  1. Of, relating to, or near the pelvis.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.