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pence

[ pens ]

noun

, British.
  1. a plural of penny; used in referring to a sum of money rather than to the coins themselves (often used in combination):

    sixpence; The fare was 15 pence.



pence

/ pɛns /

noun

  1. a plural of penny


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Usage

Since the decimalization of British currency and the introduction of the abbreviation p, as in 10p, 85p, etc, the abbreviation has tended to replace pence in speech, as in 4p ˌfɔːˈpiː , 12p ˌtwɛlvˈpiː , etc
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Other Words From

  • penceless adjective
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Word History and Origins

Origin of pence1

1275–1325; Middle English pens, pans
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Example Sentences

Pence, who has not-so-secret 2024 ambitions, has also talked about immigration in recent speeches.

The testimony aired Thursday evening of the agents’ state of mind, coupled with the footage from that day of a scurrying Pence, laid bare the very real risk the presidential backup faced.

From Time

Like many others, Pence is looking at polling and the 2024 field, and plotting his own revenge.

From TIme

They punctuated this with never-before-seen images of Pence in the secure underground location where the secret service had escorted him after the mob breached the Capitol building.

Bova went to high school with Pence in Indiana and was still haranguing him about attending the upcoming class reunion.

From TIme

And similar shards of enthusiasm-killing kryptonite are lodged in John Kasich, Mike Pence and Ted Cruz.

But Pence, who was slated to keynote this conference in just a few minutes?

Much of the praise of Pence is in this vein—he will not embarrass us.

Pence told the crowd, however, that he had only first come to New York 13 years ago, at the age of 40, when he was a congressman.

Pence, with his thick mane of hair and thick build, looks great on a flier.

In 1205 wheat was worth 12 pence per bushel, which was cheap, as there had been some years of famine previous thereto.

The King now increased it to the enormous sum of two shilling and ten pence.

They went away feeling ready for any trouble in reason, and they gave Leo more peacock feathers and pence than he could count.

On hearing this, the Earl of Gloucester at once sent Bruce a broad hint in the form of twelve pence and a pair of spurs.

Finally, on March 5, 1770, the Townshend Acts were repealed with the exception of the tax on tea: three pence per pound.

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