peroration

[ per-uh-rey-shuhn ]
/ ˌpɛr əˈreɪ ʃən /

noun

a long speech characterized by lofty and often pompous language.
Rhetoric. the concluding part of a speech or discourse, in which the speaker or writer recapitulates the principal points and urges them with greater earnestness and force.

QUIZZES

WHO SAID IT: A QUIZ ON PRESIDENTIAL WIT AND WISDOM

Think you know your presidents? Take this quiz and see if you can match the style, wit, and ideology of these memorable lines to the right POTUS.
Question 1 of 9
“I do believe that the buck stops here, that I cannot rely upon public opinion polls to tell me what is right. I do believe that right makes might and that if I am wrong, 10 angels swearing I was right would make no difference.”

Origin of peroration

1400–50; late Middle English <Latin perōrātiōn- (stem of perōrātiō) the closing of a speech. See perorate, -ion

OTHER WORDS FROM peroration

per·o·ra·tion·al, per·o·ra·tive, adjectiveper·or·a·tor·i·cal [puh-rawr-uh-tawr-i-kuhl, -ror-uh-tor-], /pəˌrɔr əˈtɔr ɪ kəl, -ˌrɒr əˈtɒr-/, adjectiveper·or·a·tor·i·cal·ly, adverbper·or·a·to·ry [puh-rawr-uh-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee, -ror-], /pəˈrɔr əˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i, -ˈrɒr-/, noun

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH peroration

oration, peroration
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for peroration

British Dictionary definitions for peroration

peroration
/ (ˌpɛrəˈreɪʃən) /

noun

rhetoric the conclusion of a speech or discourse, in which points made previously are summed up or recapitulated, esp with greater emphasis

Word Origin for peroration

C15: from Latin perōrātiō, from perōrāre, from per- (thoroughly) + orāre to speak
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012