Dictionary.com

peroration

[ per-uh-rey-shuhn ]
/ ˌpɛr əˈreɪ ʃən /
Save This Word!

noun
a long speech characterized by lofty and often pompous language.
Rhetoric. the concluding part of a speech or discourse, in which the speaker or writer recapitulates the principal points and urges them with greater earnestness and force.
QUIZ
FIRE UP YOUR VOCAB FOR A "RED" SYNONYMS QUIZ
No fire engine reds here, only a fierce collection of vibrant words for the color red to test yourself on.
Question 1 of 7
What does "amaranth" mean?
Meet Grammar CoachWrite or paste your essay, email, or story into Grammar Coach and get grammar helpImprove Your Writing
Meet Grammar CoachImprove Your Writing
Write or paste your essay, email, or story into Grammar Coach and get grammar help

Origin of peroration

1400–50; late Middle English <Latin perōrātiōn- (stem of perōrātiō) the closing of a speech. See perorate, -ion

OTHER WORDS FROM peroration

per·o·ra·tion·al, per·o·ra·tive, adjectiveper·or·a·tor·i·cal [puh-rawr-uh-tawr-i-kuhl, -ror-uh-tor-], /pəˌrɔr əˈtɔr ɪ kəl, -ˌrɒr əˈtɒr-/, adjectiveper·or·a·tor·i·cal·ly, adverbper·or·a·to·ry [puh-rawr-uh-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee, -ror-], /pəˈrɔr əˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i, -ˈrɒr-/, noun

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH peroration

oration, peroration
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use peroration in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for peroration

peroration
/ (ˌpɛrəˈreɪʃən) /

noun
rhetoric the conclusion of a speech or discourse, in which points made previously are summed up or recapitulated, esp with greater emphasis

Word Origin for peroration

C15: from Latin perōrātiō, from perōrāre, from per- (thoroughly) + orāre to speak
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
FEEDBACK