philosophe

[ fil-uh-sof, fil-uh-zof; French fee-law-zawf ]
/ ˈfɪl əˌsɒf, ˌfɪl əˈzɒf; French fi lɔˈzɔf /

noun, plural phil·o·sophes [fil-uh-sofs, fil-uh-zofs; French fee-law-zawf] /ˈfɪl əˌsɒfs, ˌfɪl əˈzɒfs; French fi lɔˈzɔf/.

any of the popular French intellectuals or social philosophers of the 18th century, as Diderot, Rousseau, or Voltaire.
a philosophaster.

Origin of philosophe

Borrowed into English from French around 1770–80
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

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Culture definitions for philosophes

philosophes

[ (fee-luh-zawf) ]

A group of radical thinkers and writers in France in the eighteenth century, including Voltaire and Jean-Jacques Rousseau. The philosophes stressed the use of human reason and were especially critical of established religious and political practices in France.

The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.