Idioms

    on the pig's back, Australian Slang. in a fortunate position.
    pig it,
    1. to live like a pig, especially in dirt.
    2. to lead a disorganized, makeshift life; live without plan or pattern.

Origin of pig

1
1175–1225; Middle English pigge young pig, with doubled consonant appropriate to terms for smaller animals (cf. dog, frog1) but with no obvious relations; almost certainly not akin to Low German, Dutch big(ge), Middle Dutch vigghe young pig, which involve further obscurities; if Danish pige, Swedish piga maid, young girl are compared, perhaps < ON word meaning “young, small,” applied in Scand to girls but in OE to swine
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


British Dictionary definitions for pig it

pig

noun

any artiodactyl mammal of the African and Eurasian family Suidae, esp Sus scrofa (domestic pig), typically having a long head with a movable snout, a thick bristle-covered skin, and, in wild species, long curved tusks
a domesticated pig weighing more than 120 pounds (54 kg)Related adjective: porcine
informal a dirty, greedy, or bad-mannered person
the meat of swine; pork
derogatory a slang word for policeman
  1. a mass of metal, such as iron, copper, or lead, cast into a simple shape for ease of storing or transportation
  2. a mould in which such a mass of metal is formed
British informal something that is difficult or unpleasant
an automated device propelled through a duct or pipeline to clear impediments or check for faults, leaks, etc
a pig in a poke something bought or received without prior sight or knowledge
make a pig of oneself informal to overindulge oneself
on the pig's back Irish and NZ successful; establishedhe's on the pig's back now

verb pigs, pigging or pigged

(intr) (of a sow) to give birth
Also: pig it (intr) informal to live in squalor
(tr) informal to devour (food) greedily
See also pig out

Word Origin for pig

C13 pigge, of obscure origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for pig it

pig

n.

probably from Old English *picg, found in compounds, ultimate origin unknown. Originally "young pig" (the word for adults was swine). Apparently related to Low German bigge, Dutch big ("but the phonology is difficult" -- OED). The meaning "oblong piece of metal" is first attested 1580s, on the notion of "large mass." Applied to persons, usually in contempt, since 1540s; the derogatory slang meaning "police officer" has been in underworld slang since at least 1811.

The pigs frisked my panney, and nailed my screws; the officers searched my house, and seized my picklock keys. ["Dictionary of Buckish Slang, University Wit and Pickpocket Eloquence," London, 1811]

Another Old English word for "pig" was fearh, related to furh "furrow," from PIE *perk- "dig, furrow" (cf. Latin porc-us "pig," see pork). "This reflects a widespread IE tendency to name animals from typical attributes or activities" [Lass]. Synonyms grunter, porker are from sailors' and fishermen's euphemistic avoidance of uttering the word pig at sea, a superstition perhaps based on the fate of the Gadarene swine, who drowned. The image of a pig in a poke is attested from 1520s (see poke (n.3)). Flying pigs as a type of something unreal is from 1610s.

pig

v.

1670s, "to huddle together," from pig (n.). Related: Pigged; pigging. To pig out "eat voraciously" attested by 1979.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with pig it

pig it

Live in a slovenly way, as in Ten roommates shared that small house, and as you might guess they were pigging it. [Slang; late 1800s]

pig

In addition to the idioms beginning with pig

  • pig in a poke
  • pig it
  • pig out

also see:

  • in a pig's eye
  • like pigs in clover
  • make a pig of oneself
  • when pigs fly
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.