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pigtail

[pig-teyl]
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noun
  1. a braid of hair hanging down the back of the head.
  2. tobacco in a thin, twisted roll.
  3. Electricity.
    1. a short, flexible wire used in connecting a stationary terminal with a terminal having a limited range of motion.
    2. a short wire connected to an electric device, as a lead or ground.
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Origin of pigtail

First recorded in 1680–90; pig1 + tail1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Related Words

pigtailponytailhairdohaircutbraidheaddressdreadlocksqueueplaittrimflipwavehairpermanenttailteasebeehiveDAAfro

Examples from the Web for pigtail

Contemporary Examples

Historical Examples

  • She put the end of a pigtail in her mouth and sat down on the chair opposite.

    Dream Town

    Henry Slesar

  • And, now, if you will give me that pigtail, I will try to sew it to this skull-cap.

  • After a time the woman produced Charlie's pigtail, and handed it to the man to look at.

  • Patch: Was n't it Noah, Captain; as got his pigtail cut by some designin' woman?

    Wappin' Wharf

    Charles S. Brooks

  • With the pigtail coiled inside of the lost shoe, Mell ran on.

    Nine Little Goslings

    Susan Coolidge


British Dictionary definitions for pigtail

pigtail

noun
  1. a bunch of hair or one of two bunches on either side of the face, worn loose or plaited
  2. a twisted roll of tobacco
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Derived Formspigtailed, adjective
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for pigtail

n.

1680s, "tobacco in a twisted roll," from pig (n.) + tail (n.). So called from resemblance. Meaning "braid of hair" is from 1753, when it was a fashion among soldiers and sailors. Applied variously to other objects or parts thought to resemble this in appearance.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper