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pitchfork

[ pich-fawrk ]

noun

  1. a large, long-handled fork for manually lifting and pitching pitch pitching hay, stalks of grain, etc.
  2. pitchforks, Northern U.S. beggar's-lice, especially the achenes of Spanish needles.


verb (used with object)

  1. to pitch or throw with or as if with a pitchfork.

pitchfork

/ ˈpɪtʃˌfɔːk /

noun

  1. a long-handled fork with two or three long curved tines for lifting, turning, or tossing hay


verb

  1. to use a pitchfork on (something)
  2. to thrust (someone) unwillingly into a position

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Word History and Origins

Origin of pitchfork1

late Middle English word dating back to 1425–75; pitch 1, fork

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Example Sentences

In place of torches and pitchforks, however, the campus workforce held signs that read, “Just Do Better,” “We Believe Mary,” and “Empower Women.”

From Fortune

Pitchfork called him a “a rap-obsessed misfit from a summer camp who freestyles poorly” who is “ridiculous without knowing it.”

Jessica Hopper, senior editor of The Pitchfork Review, offered a mixed-to-negative assessment.

“Its all-ages, aisle-reaching attitude is ready for mass consumption,” according to Pitchfork.

A living, doddering Lee was far less useful to the pitchfork crowd than a hanged, virile Lee would have been.

No more scanning the pages of Pitchfork for news about The Kid Daytona, Kanye West and Kendrick Lamar I just follow their tweets.

There are three there, Bill, with a jolly large blue unicorn and a gold pitchfork on em, which is the old ladys arms.

"It's a long time sence I've seen that old white hoss with the big pitchfork brand on his shoulder," said Talpers.

It follows deep wounds such as are made by a hayrake or a pitchfork; or seared wounds, such as are made by a toy pistol.

One attacked a settler, who returned a mortal wound with a pitchfork.

When a pitchfork is struck, in order to pitch a tune, its end is put on the table, and a greater sound is produced.

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