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placate

1
[ pley-keyt, plak-eyt ]
/ ˈpleɪ keɪt, ˈplæk eɪt /
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See synonyms for: placate / placated / placating / placater on Thesaurus.com

verb (used with object), pla·cat·ed, pla·cat·ing.
to appease or pacify, especially by concessions or conciliatory gestures: to placate an outraged citizenry.
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Origin of placate

1
First recorded in 1670–80; from Latin plācātus, past participle of plācāre “to quiet, calm, appease,” akin to placēre “to please”; cf. please

OTHER WORDS FROM placate

pla·cat·er, nounpla·ca·tion [pley-key-shuhn], /pleɪˈkeɪ ʃən/, nounun·pla·cat·ed, adjective

Other definitions for placate (2 of 2)

placate2
[ plak-eyt, -it ]
/ ˈplæk eɪt, -ɪt /

noun Armor.
a piece of plate armor of the 15th to the 18th century protecting the lower part of the torso in front: used especially as a reinforcement over a breastplate.
Also placard, placcate, plackart.

Origin of placate

2
First recorded in 1625–35; apparently variant of placard
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2023

British Dictionary definitions for placate

placate
/ (pləˈkeɪt) /

verb
(tr) to pacify or appease

Derived forms of placate

placation, noun

Word Origin for placate

C17: from Latin plācāre; see placable
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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