pontoon

1
[ pon-toon ]
/ pɒnˈtun /

noun

Military. a boat or some other floating structure used as one of the supports for a temporary bridge over a river.
a float for a derrick, landing stage, etc.
Nautical. a float for raising a sunken or deeply laden vessel in the water; a camel or caisson.
a seaplane float.

RELATED WORDS


Nearby words

  1. pontocaine,
  2. pontoise,
  3. pontomedullary groove,
  4. ponton,
  5. pontonier,
  6. pontoon bridge,
  7. pontoppidan,
  8. pontoppidan, henrik,
  9. pontormo,
  10. pontus

Also pon·ton [pon-tn] /ˈpɒn tn/.

Origin of pontoon

1
1585–95; < French ponton < Latin pontōn- (stem of pontō) flat-bottomed boat, punt

pontoon

2
[ pon-toon ]
/ pɒnˈtun /

noun British.

the card game twenty-one.

Origin of pontoon

2
1915–20; alteration of French vingt-et-un twenty-one

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for pontoon


British Dictionary definitions for pontoon

pontoon

1
/ (pɒnˈtuːn) /

noun

  1. a watertight float or vessel used where buoyancy is required in water, as in supporting a bridge, in salvage work, or where a temporary or mobile structure is required in military operations
  2. (as modifier)a pontoon bridge
nautical a float, often inflatable, for raising a vessel in the water

Word Origin for pontoon

C17: from French ponton, from Latin pontō punt, floating bridge, from pōns bridge

noun

Also called: (esp US) twenty-one, vingt-et-un a gambling game in which players try to obtain card combinations worth 21 points
(in this game) the combination of an ace with a ten or court card when dealt to a player as his first two cards

Word Origin for pontoon

C20: probably an alteration of French vingt-et-un, literally: twenty-one

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for pontoon

pontoon

n.

"flat-bottomed boat" (especially one to support a temporary bridge), 1670s, from French pontoon, from Old French ponton (14c.) "bridge, drawbridge, boat-bridge; flat-bottomed boat," from Latin pontonem (nominative ponto) "flat-bottomed boat," from pons "bridge" (see pons). Pontoon bridge is first recorded 1778.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper