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praenomen

or pre·no·men

[pree-noh-muh n]
noun, plural prae·nom·i·na [pree-nom-uh-nuh, -noh-muh-] /priˈnɒm ə nə, -ˈnoʊ mə-/, prae·no·mens.
  1. the first or personal name of a Roman citizen, as “Gaius” in “Gaius Julius Caesar.”
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Origin of praenomen

1655–65; < Latin praenōmen, equivalent to prae- prae- + nōmen name
Related formsprae·nom·i·nal [pree-nom-uh-nl] /priˈnɒm ə nl/, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for praenomen

Historical Examples

  • It is impossible to discover even his full name, Gaius or Caius being merely the personal name (praenomen) so common in Rome.

    Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 11, Slice 4

    Various

  • His person more than justified his praenomen, for Mr. Harper Freeman, Jr., was undeniably fat.

    Corporal Cameron

    Ralph Connor

  • Such a praenomen carries with it suggestions of a rich brogue rather than a nasal drawl.

  • Titus is here the first name (praenomen) which was given sons on the ninth day after their birth.

  • The name of the month in which he was born was changed to Julius, from his praenomen, and we still retain the name.


British Dictionary definitions for praenomen

praenomen

noun plural -nomina (-ˈnɒmɪnə) or -nomens
  1. an ancient Roman's first or given nameSee also agnomen, cognomen, nomen
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Derived Formspraenominal (priːˈnɒmɪnəl), adjectivepraenominally, adverb

Word Origin

C18: from Latin, from prae- before + nōmen name
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for praenomen

n.

from Latin praenomen, literally "before the name," from prae- (see pre-) + nomen (see name (n.)).

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper