praseodymium

[ prey-zee-oh-dim-ee-uh m, prey-see- ]
/ ˌpreɪ zi oʊˈdɪm i əm, ˌpreɪ si- /

noun Chemistry.

a rare-earth, metallic, trivalent element, named from its green salts. Symbol: Pr; atomic weight: 140.91; atomic number: 59; specific gravity: 6.77 at 20°C.

Nearby words

Origin of praseodymium

1880–85; < New Latin, equivalent to praseo- (combining form representing Greek prásios leek-green; see prase) + (di)dymium
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

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British Dictionary definitions for praseodymium

praseodymium

/ (ˌpreɪzɪəʊˈdɪmɪəm) /

noun

a malleable ductile silvery-white element of the lanthanide series of metals. It occurs principally in monazite and bastnaesite and is used with other rare earths in carbon-arc lights and as a pigment in glass. Symbol: Pr; atomic no: 59; atomic wt: 140.90765; valency: 3; relative density: 6.773; melting pt: 931°C; boiling pt: 3520°C

Word Origin for praseodymium

C20: New Latin, from Greek prasios of a leek-green colour + didymium
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medicine definitions for praseodymium

praseodymium

[ prā′zē-ō-dĭmē-əm, prā′sē- ]

n. Symbol Pr

A soft malleable ductile rare-earth element that develops a characteristic green tarnish in air and is used to color glass and ceramics yellow and in metallic alloy. Atomic number 59.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Science definitions for praseodymium

praseodymium

[ prā′zē-ō-dĭmē-əm ]

Pr

A soft, malleable, silvery metallic element of the lanthanide series that develops a green tarnish in air. It is used to add a yellow tint to glass and ceramics and to make the glass used in welding goggles. Atomic number 59; atomic weight 140.908; melting point 935°C; boiling point 3,127°C; specific gravity 6.8; valence 3, 4. See Periodic Table.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.