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pre-empt

/ prɪˈɛmpt /

verb

  1. tr to acquire in advance of or to the exclusion of others; appropriate
  2. tr to occupy (public land) in order to acquire a prior right to purchase
  3. intr bridge to make a high opening bid, often on a weak hand, to shut out opposition bidding


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Derived Forms

  • pre-ˈemptor, noun
  • pre-ˈemptory, adjective
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Example Sentences

He'll be briefed on the risks of Iranian retaliation, and he will be offered a menu of options to pre-empt such retaliation.

As a growing number of affiliates threatened to pre-empt the show, Gaspin said he realized “that this was not going to go well.”

Neither party should engage in efforts or take actions that could unilaterally pre-empt, or appear to pre-empt, negotiations.

According to the vice president, we will strive to prevent threats but not pre-empt them.

So late as 1872 an Indian received special permission to pre-empt one hundred acres.

The aim should be to pre-empt the ground for cleanness and truth.

The favorite rumor was that the entire firm was a decoy to bewilder agents of foreign powers and pre-empt their espionage efforts.

If fortunate to find such, they at once pre-empt the old lodge and make it their home and headquarters.

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