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prelude

[ prel-yood, preyl-, prey-lood, pree- ]
/ 藞pr蓻l yud, 藞pre瑟l-, 藞pre瑟 lud, 藞pri- /
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noun
verb (used with object), prel路ud路ed, prel路ud路ing.
verb (used without object), prel路ud路ed, prel路ud路ing.
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Origin of prelude

1555鈥65; (noun) <Medieval Latin prael奴dium, equivalent to prae-pre- + -l奴dium play; compare Latin l奴dus play; (v.) <Latin prael奴dere to play beforehand

OTHER WORDS FROM prelude

prel路ud路er, nounpre路lu路di路al [pri-loo-dee-uhl], /pr瑟藞lu di 蓹l/, pre路lu路di路ous, adjectivepre路lu路di路ous路ly, adverbun路prel路ud路ed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 漏 Random House, Inc. 2023

How to use prelude in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for prelude

prelude
/ (藞pr蓻lju藧d) /

noun
  1. a piece of music that precedes a fugue, or forms the first movement of a suite, or an introduction to an act in an opera, etc
  2. (esp for piano) a self-contained piece of music
something serving as an introduction or preceding event, occurrence, etc
verb
to serve as a prelude to (something)
(tr) to introduce by a prelude

Derived forms of prelude

Word Origin for prelude

C16: (n) from Medieval Latin prael奴dium, from prae before + -l奴dium entertainment, from Latin l奴dus play; (vb) from Late Latin prael奴dere to play beforehand, rehearse, from l奴dere to play
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition 漏 William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 漏 HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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