prevarication

[pri-var-i-key-shuh n]

noun

the act of prevaricating, or lying: Seeing the expression on his mother's face, Nathan realized this was no time for prevarication.
a false or deliberate misstatement; lie: Her many prevarications had apparently paid off; she was free to go.

Nearby words

  1. prevailingly,
  2. prevalence,
  3. prevalent,
  4. prevalently,
  5. prevaricate,
  6. prevaricator,
  7. prevenance,
  8. prevenience,
  9. prevenient,
  10. prevenient grace

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for prevarication


Word Origin and History for prevarication

prevarication

n.

late 14c., "divergence from a right course, transgression," from Old French prevaricacion "breaking of God's laws, disobedience (to the Faith)" (12c., Modern French prévarication) and directly from Latin praevaricationem (nominative praevaricatio) "duplicity, collusion, a stepping out of line (of duty or behavior)," noun of action from past participle stem of praevaricari "to make a sham accusation, deviate," literally "walk crookedly," in Church Latin, "to transgress," from prae "before" (see pre-) + varicare "to straddle," from varicus "straddling," from varus "bowlegged, knock-kneed" (see varus). Meaning "evasion, quibbling" is attested from 1650s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper