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prick

[ prik ]
/ prɪk /
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noun
verb (used with object)
verb (used without object)
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The rainy weather could not ________ my elated spirits on my graduation day.
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Idioms about prick

    kick against the pricks, to resist incontestable facts or authority; protest uselessly: In appealing the case again, you will just be kicking against the pricks.
    prick up one's ears, to become very alert; listen attentively: The reporter pricked up his ears at the prospect of a scoop.

Origin of prick

before 1000; (noun) Middle English prike;Old English prica, price dot, point; (v.) Middle English priken,Old English prician; cognate with Dutch, Low German prik point

OTHER WORDS FROM prick

pricker, nounprick·ing·ly, adverbun·pricked, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use prick in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for prick

prick
/ (prɪk) /

verb (mainly tr)
noun

Word Origin for prick

Old English prica point, puncture; related to Dutch prik, Icelandic prik short stick, Swedish prick point, stick
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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