primer

1
[ prim-er or, esp. British, prahy-mer ]
/ ˈprɪm ər or, esp. British, ˈpraɪ mər /
|

noun

an elementary book for teaching children to read.
any book of elementary principles: a primer of phonetics.

Origin of primer

1
1350–1400; Middle English < Medieval Latin prīmārium, noun use of neuter of prīmārius primary

Definition for primers (2 of 2)

primer

2
[ prahy-mer ]
/ ˈpraɪ mər /

noun

a person or thing that primes.
a cap, cylinder, etc., containing a compound that may be exploded by percussion or other means, used for firing a charge of powder.
a first coat or layer of paint, size, etc., given to any surface as a base, sealer, or the like.

Origin of primer

2
1490–1500; prime (v.) + -er1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for primers

British Dictionary definitions for primers (1 of 3)

primers

/ (ˈprɪməz) /

pl n

NZ informal the youngest class in a primary school

British Dictionary definitions for primers (2 of 3)

primer

1
/ (ˈpraɪmə) /

noun

an introductory text, such as a school textbook

Word Origin for primer

C14: via Anglo-Norman from Medieval Latin primārius (liber) a first (book), from Latin prīmārius primary

British Dictionary definitions for primers (3 of 3)

primer

2
/ (ˈpraɪmə) /

noun

a person or thing that primes
a device, such as a tube containing explosive, for detonating the main charge in a gun, mine, etc
a substance, such as paint, applied to a surface as a base, sealer, etc

Also called (for senses 2, 3): priming

Word Origin for primer

C15: see prime (vb)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012