primer

1
[ prim-er or, esp. British, prahy-mer ]
/ ˈprɪm ər or, esp. British, ˈpraɪ mər /
|

noun

an elementary book for teaching children to read.
any book of elementary principles: a primer of phonetics.

Nearby words

  1. prime ribs,
  2. prime the pump,
  3. prime time,
  4. prime vertical,
  5. primely,
  6. primero,
  7. primers,
  8. primeval,
  9. primigravida,
  10. primine

Origin of primer

1
1350–1400; Middle English < Medieval Latin prīmārium, noun use of neuter of prīmārius primary

primer

2
[ prahy-mer ]
/ ˈpraɪ mər /

noun

a person or thing that primes.
a cap, cylinder, etc., containing a compound that may be exploded by percussion or other means, used for firing a charge of powder.
a first coat or layer of paint, size, etc., given to any surface as a base, sealer, or the like.

Origin of primer

2
1490–1500; prime (v.) + -er1

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for primers


British Dictionary definitions for primers

primers

/ (ˈprɪməz) /

pl n

NZ informal the youngest class in a primary school

primer

1
/ (ˈpraɪmə) /

noun

an introductory text, such as a school textbook

Word Origin for primer

C14: via Anglo-Norman from Medieval Latin primārius (liber) a first (book), from Latin prīmārius primary

primer

2
/ (ˈpraɪmə) /

noun

a person or thing that primes
a device, such as a tube containing explosive, for detonating the main charge in a gun, mine, etc
a substance, such as paint, applied to a surface as a base, sealer, etc
Also called (for senses 2, 3): priming

Word Origin for primer

C15: see prime (vb)

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for primers
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper