privilege

[ priv-uh-lij, priv-lij ]
/ ˈprɪv ə lɪdʒ, ˈprɪv lɪdʒ /

noun

verb (used with object), priv·i·leged, priv·i·leg·ing.

Origin of privilege

1125–75; (noun) Middle English; earlier privilegie (< Old French privilege) < Latin prīvilēgium orig., a law for or against an individual, equivalent to prīvi- (combining form of prīvus one's own) + lēg- (see legal) + -ium -ium; (v.) Middle English privilegen (< Middle French privilegier) < Medieval Latin prīvilēgiāre, derivative of prīvilēgium

SYNONYMS FOR privilege

1 Privilege, prerogative refer to a special advantage or right possessed by an individual or group. A privilege is a right or advantage gained by birth, social position, effort, or concession. It can have either legal or personal sanction: the privilege of paying half fare; the privilege of calling whenever one wishes. Prerogative refers to an exclusive right claimed and granted, often officially or legally, on the basis of social status, heritage, sex, etc.: the prerogatives of a king; the prerogatives of management.
4 license, freedom, liberty.

OTHER WORDS FROM privilege

priv·i·leg·er, nounpro·priv·i·lege, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for privilege

British Dictionary definitions for privilege

privilege
/ (ˈprɪvɪlɪdʒ) /

noun

verb (tr)

to bestow a privilege or privileges upon
(foll by from) to free or exempt

Word Origin for privilege

C12: from Old French privilēge, from Latin prīvilēgium law relevant to rights of an individual, from prīvus an individual + lēx law
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012