prohibitive

[ proh-hib-i-tiv ]
/ proʊˈhɪb ɪ tɪv /

adjective

serving or tending to prohibit or forbid something: We will discuss some of the discriminatory, prohibitive legislation that was undone by the Civil Rights Act.
sufficing to prevent the use, purchase, etc., of something: prohibitive prices.
having so great a likelihood of success that others vying for the same thing are essentially prevented from succeeding: Political analysts are largely in agreement over who the party’s prohibitive nominee is.

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Also pro·hib·i·to·ry [proh-hib-i-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee] /proʊˈhɪb ɪˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i/ .

Origin of prohibitive

First recorded in 1400–50; from Medieval Latin prohibitīvus; see origin at prohibit, -ive

OTHER WORDS FROM prohibitive

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for prohibitive

British Dictionary definitions for prohibitive

prohibitive

less commonly prohibitory (prəˈhɪbɪtərɪ, -trɪ)

/ (prəˈhɪbɪtɪv) /

adjective

prohibiting or tending to prohibit
(esp of prices) tending or designed to discourage sale or purchase

Derived forms of prohibitive

prohibitively, adverbprohibitiveness, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012