prole

[ prohl, proh-lee ]
/ proʊl, ˈproʊ li /

noun Informal.

a member of the proletariat.
a person who performs routine tasks in a society.

adjective

Origin of prole

First recorded in 1885–90; shortened form of proletariat
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for prole

  • They reported to a woman named Farilla, who ran a fortune-telling parlor in the Prole district.

    Time Crime|H. Beam Piper
  • It's safer to kill a Citizen than bloody a Prole's nose; they have all sorts of laws to protect them.

    Time Crime|H. Beam Piper
  • "He's a Prole named Yandragno, sir," one of the policemen said.

    Time Crime|H. Beam Piper

British Dictionary definitions for prole

prole

/ (prəʊl) /

noun, adjective

derogatory, slang, mainly British short for proletarian
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for prole

prole


n.

short for proletarian (n.), 1887 (G.B. Shaw); popularized by George Orwell's 1949 novel "Nineteen Eighty-Four." As an adjective from 1938. Related: Proly (adj.); prolier-than-thou.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper