Dictionary.com

proleptic

[ proh-lep-tik ]
/ proʊˈlɛp tɪk /
Save This Word!

adjective
(of a date) retroactively calculated using a later calendar than the one used at the time:To make comparisons more simple, all dates are shown using the proleptic Gregorian calendar—that is, the modern Western calendar extrapolated into the past.
involving or characterized by prolepsis, the anticipatory use of arguments, adjectives, etc.: The proleptic idiom “to be dead meat” uses a present-tense description to suggest one’s future doom.
anticipatory; foreshadowing: The proleptic detail of the borrowed scythe clearly reveals that the character’s life on stage will be of short duration.
QUIZ
QUIZ YOURSELF ON "WAS" VS. "WERE"!
Were you ready for a quiz on this topic? Well, here it is! See how well you can differentiate between the uses of "was" vs. "were" in this quiz.
Question 1 of 7
“Was” is used for the indicative past tense of “to be,” and “were” is only used for the subjunctive past tense.
Sometimes pro·lep·ti·cal [proh-lep-ti-kuhl] /proʊˈlɛp tɪ kəl/ .

OTHER WORDS FROM proleptic

pro·lep·ti·cal·ly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use proleptic in a sentence

FEEDBACK