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prolixity

[ proh-lik-si-tee ]
/ proʊˈlɪk sɪ ti /
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noun
the state or quality of being unnecessarily or tediously wordy; verbosity: The book offers food for thought but, for all its prolixity, fails to effectively explain what is at the core of irony as a rhetorical strategy.
a tendency to speak or write at great or tedious length:As a communicator, the official suffers from a lethal mix of ailments: terminal prolixity, rampant hyperbole, and a preference for bureaucratic jargon.
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Rarely pro·lix·ness [proh-liks-nis] /proʊˈlɪks nɪs/ .

Origin of prolixity

First recorded in 1350–1400; Middle English, from Middle French prolixité “lengthiness, verbosity,” from Late Latin prōlixitās (inflectional stem prōlixitāt- ) “tedious length in speech or writing,” from Latin: “extension in time or space”; see origin at prolix

OTHER WORDS FROM prolixity

o·ver·pro·lix·i·ty, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

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